For More Information, Contact:

Wednesday, November 1, 2017 - by

Getting two political parties to equitably draw congressional district boundaries can seem hopeless, but Carnegie Mellon University researchers say the process can be improved by using an approach children use to share a piece of cake.

Just as having one child cut the cake and giving the second child first choice of the pieces avoids either feeling envious, having two political parties sequentially divide up a state in an "I-Cut-You-Freeze" protocol would minimize the practice of gerrymandering, where a dominant political party draws districts to maximize its electoral advantage.

For More Information, Contact:

We propose a general class of language models that treat reference as an explicit stochastic latent variable. This architecture allows models to create mentions of entities and their attributes by accessing external databases (required by, e.g., dialogue generation and recipe generation) and internal state (required by, e.g. language models which are aware of

For More Information, Contact:

It is an open problem in static resource bound analysis to connect high-level resource bounds (order of complexity) with the actual execution time and memory usage of compiled  machine code. We propose to use machine learning to derive a cost model for a high-level source language that approximates the execution cost of compiled programs, including garbage collection, on a specific hardware platform.

For More Information, Contact:

We consider the problem of quantum state certification, where one is given n​ copies of an unknown d​ -dimensional quantum mixed state ρ​ and one wants to test whether ρ​ is equal to some known mixed state σ​ or else is ε​-far from σ​.

For More Information, Contact:

A software watermarking scheme allows one to embed a "mark" into a program without significantly altering the behavior of the program. Moreover, it should be difficult to remove the watermark without destroying the functionality of the program. Recently, Cohen et al. (STOC 2016) and Boneh et al. (PKC 2017) showed how to watermark cryptographic functionalities such as pseudorandom functions (PRFs) using general-purpose indistinguishability obfuscation, and left open the question of realizing watermarking from weaker assumptions.

For More Information, Contact:

Database management systems (DBMSs) are the most important component of any data-intensive application. They can handle large amounts of data and complex workloads. But they're difficult to manage because they have hundreds of configuration "knobs" that control factors such as the amount of memory to use for caches and how often to write data to storage. Organizations often hire experts to help with tuning activities, but experts are prohibitively expensive for many.

For More Information, Contact:

Please join in for a special panel discussion, with special guests:

Lorrie Cranor
FORE Systems Professor of Computer Science and Engineering & Public Policy and Director, CyLab Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory, Carnegie Mellon University
Moderator

Panelists

David A. Eckhardt
Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University

For More Information, Contact:

The presence of aliasing makes modular verification of object-oriented code difficult. If multiple clients depend on the properties of an object, one client may break a property that others depend on.

For More Information, Contact:

Friday, October 20, 2017 - by

About 100 female computer science majors from across the U.S. and overseas will gather at Carnegie Mellon University this weekend to attend OurCS, a workshop designed to give them hands-on experience with research.

Nancy Amato, Regents Professor and Unocal Professor in computer science and engineering at Texas A& M University, and Alison Derbenwick Miller, vice president of Oracle Academy, will share their insights on computer science research during the three-day event, which begins today.

For More Information, Contact:

Pages

Subscribe to Carnegie Mellon University - Computer Science Department RSS